Should You Give Your Nanny A Raise When A Puppy Is Added To The Home?

Should You Give Your Nanny A Raise When A Puppy Is Added To The Home?

This is a post that is long overdue. The number of nannies I encounter that struggle with puppy/dog issues at their job, is kind of overwhelming! It seems like just about every other day there is a post in one of the nanny Facebook groups where a nanny is seeking advice about a new dog being added to the home. More often than not, the nanny needs advice because their nanny family fails to recognize that an untrained dog being added to the home is actually quite a lot of extra work for their nanny and it is totally inappropriate to 1. just assume a nanny is okay taking on puppy responsibilities and 2. not offer appropriate compensation if a nanny does agree to take on puppy responsibilities

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Someday Your Nanny Will Quit: An Open Letter To Parents

Someday Your Nanny Will Quit: An Open Letter To Parents

Parents who employ nannies, if I may take a few minutes of your time, I have something I need to address. As I’m sure you’re aware, nannying is very different from other professions. Your nanny works in your home. Your nanny spends their days caring for your precious children. You depend on them to be there in your absence; your children love and need them. We know how personal it feels to you, because it feels personal to us too.

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Attn: Work at Home Parents, You and Your Nanny are Sharing an Office!

Attn: Work at Home Parents, You and Your Nanny are Sharing an Office!

A parent who works from home can be one of the biggest deal breakers for a nanny. If you ask nannies why, they will tell you that having a parent in the home generally makes a nanny’s job harder. For a nanny, the home they work in is their “office” and oftentimes parents forget this. Typically, nannies have a way of doing things and a specific routine in place for every part of the day; which is something they have perfected over the years in their nanny career. When a parent is home, they often disrupt that flow and as a result, the nanny’s job is almost never easier than when they are on their own with the kids. This is not to say that parents should never be around or involved.. these are their kids, after all.. but whether a parent works in or out of the home, it is so important to allow the nanny be the authority figure you have hired them to be.

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I'm a Nanny, Not a House Cleaner

I want to start this article with a question for parents: Would you ever ask your house cleaner to change your child's diaper, or take your child to the park, or prepare and feed your child lunch, or pick your child up from school, or assist your child with homework, or take your child to the doctor, or research and plan a developmentally appropriate sensory activity, or set up and host a play date, or sleep train your baby? I bet your answer is a resounding "No". Why then, do parents often ask and expect nannies to take on house cleaner roles? I truly don't get it. If you wouldn't do the reverse and have your weekly cleaning person take care of your child, why then is it okay to expect your nanny clean your home? A nanny and a house cleaner are two VERY different jobs and generally speaking, most nannies don't decide to become a nanny so they can clean houses -- they decide to be a nanny because they love children and are passionate about investing in them.

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Why You Need to Reimburse Your Nanny for Mileage

Take a moment to imagine the following scenario: You work at a job that requires you to use your personal vehicle for business related drives. You have to drive all around town running various errands, picking people up/dropping them off, driving people to and from activities, etc. Unfortunately, your employer does not reimburse your mileage. That's right -- your job requires you to use your personal vehicle for work, but it's an expense you have to incur on your own -- you have to cover all the gas and the added wear and tear on your vehicle (i.e., more frequent oil changes, needing new tires, depreciation of your vehicle, etc.). When you deduct all of the money you're spending in gas/wear and tear for your job, your take home pay is significantly less.

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