What it Means to be a Nanny

What it Means to be a Nanny

Being a nanny means that I have time to sit down and write while eating pumpernickel bagels leftover from the third birthday party that happened last Sunday. It means I come to work to find that my “nanny family” bought me another gallon of orange juice even though they don’t drink orange juice because they noticed that I drank the other entire gallon, also leftover from the third birthday party that happened last Sunday. Being a nanny means that I get asked to go on vacations to Miami. I drive the family Mercedes, shop at Whole Foods, wear comfy clothes everyday, and I live in a big, beautiful house for 50+ hours a week. 

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Saying Goodbye: A Nanny's Perspective

As a nanny, saying goodbye to a family is one of the most stressful and difficult things to do. Because the nanny-family relationship is both professional and personal, it's emotionally very hard to give notice. It can even be difficult when the nanny has every right to quit due to mistreatment and/or being taken advantage of. I say this with personal experience. Quitting my nanny jobs has NEVER been easy and I've cried just about every time I've done it.

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Sloane

As a nanny, I refuse to have favorites. Each child I've cared for holds a very special place in my heart, and I mean that earnestly. But, my bond with Sloane was different. It was unlike anything I had ever experienced before and unlike anything I have yet to experience again. I still remember interviewing for the job and thinking "Am I cut out for this? Can I handle the extra care Sloane needs?" Sloane's parents did an amazing job of nonchalantly mentioning the little "extras" involved in this job. So I was sold. Sloane won me over immediately.

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