Someday Your Nanny Will Quit: An Open Letter To Parents

Someday Your Nanny Will Quit: An Open Letter To Parents

Parents who employ nannies, if I may take a few minutes of your time, I have something I need to address. As I’m sure you’re aware, nannying is very different from other professions. Your nanny works in your home. Your nanny spends their days caring for your precious children. You depend on them to be there in your absence; your children love and need them. We know how personal it feels to you, because it feels personal to us too.

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Attn: Work at Home Parents, You and Your Nanny are Sharing an Office!

Attn: Work at Home Parents, You and Your Nanny are Sharing an Office!

A parent who works from home can be one of the biggest deal breakers for a nanny. If you ask nannies why, they will tell you that having a parent in the home generally makes a nanny’s job harder. For a nanny, the home they work in is their “office” and oftentimes parents forget this. Typically, nannies have a way of doing things and a specific routine in place for every part of the day; which is something they have perfected over the years in their nanny career. When a parent is home, they often disrupt that flow and as a result, the nanny’s job is almost never easier than when they are on their own with the kids. This is not to say that parents should never be around or involved.. these are their kids, after all.. but whether a parent works in or out of the home, it is so important to allow the nanny be the authority figure you have hired them to be.

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What it Means to be a Nanny

What it Means to be a Nanny

Being a nanny means that I have time to sit down and write while eating pumpernickel bagels leftover from the third birthday party that happened last Sunday. It means I come to work to find that my “nanny family” bought me another gallon of orange juice even though they don’t drink orange juice because they noticed that I drank the other entire gallon, also leftover from the third birthday party that happened last Sunday. Being a nanny means that I get asked to go on vacations to Miami. I drive the family Mercedes, shop at Whole Foods, wear comfy clothes everyday, and I live in a big, beautiful house for 50+ hours a week. 

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Stop Asking Me When I'm Going to Get a 'Real' Job

Oh hey you! Yes, you with your judgmental views and assumptions about what I do for a living and whether or not being a nanny qualifies as a "real" job. I'm just curious what you think I do all day at my pretend job? And what do you think I do with all that pretend money I make? I must use it to pay my pretend bills...All too often people think that nannying isn't a REAL job. Even worse -- some people don't just think it, they voice it as well. Don't believe me? Just take a look at these judgmental remarks real nannies have been subjected to.... (PS. The worst offenders tend to be a nanny's own parents, friends, significant other, and *gasp* even the parents of the kids they nanny):

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I'm a Nanny, Not a House Cleaner

I want to start this article with a question for parents: Would you ever ask your house cleaner to change your child's diaper, or take your child to the park, or prepare and feed your child lunch, or pick your child up from school, or assist your child with homework, or take your child to the doctor, or research and plan a developmentally appropriate sensory activity, or set up and host a play date, or sleep train your baby? I bet your answer is a resounding "No". Why then, do parents often ask and expect nannies to take on house cleaner roles? I truly don't get it. If you wouldn't do the reverse and have your weekly cleaning person take care of your child, why then is it okay to expect your nanny clean your home? A nanny and a house cleaner are two VERY different jobs and generally speaking, most nannies don't decide to become a nanny so they can clean houses -- they decide to be a nanny because they love children and are passionate about investing in them.

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