Nanny Discussion: How To Ask For An Annual Raise

Nanny Discussion: How To Ask For An Annual Raise

Over in our Facebook group, there was a question recently posed by a nanny (I’m summarizing here):

“I’ve been a nanny for my family for over a year. After what period of time is it appropriate to ask for a raise? How do I ask for more paid time off and sick leave? How do I ask for overtime pay, when I initially said it was ok to not be paid that?”

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Stop Asking Me When I'm Going to Get a 'Real' Job

Oh hey you! Yes, you with your judgmental views and assumptions about what I do for a living and whether or not being a nanny qualifies as a "real" job. I'm just curious what you think I do all day at my pretend job? And what do you think I do with all that pretend money I make? I must use it to pay my pretend bills...All too often people think that nannying isn't a REAL job. Even worse -- some people don't just think it, they voice it as well. Don't believe me? Just take a look at these judgmental remarks real nannies have been subjected to.... (PS. The worst offenders tend to be a nanny's own parents, friends, significant other, and *gasp* even the parents of the kids they nanny):

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Why Your Live-in Nanny Shouldn't "Pay" for Room & Board

Employing a live-in nanny can oftentimes be a little confusing. Many parents think that because a live-in nanny is receiving "free" room and board, they can pay their nanny less by deducting room and board from their nanny's monthly income, or pay them a lower hourly rate, or simply have their nanny work in exchange for room and board. A nanny who doesn't have to pay any rent, electricity, water, internet, cable, food, etc. surely should make less money per hour! While I understand how at first glance this seems like a fair deal, the industry standard is to pay a live-in nanny their full hourly rate...not a reduced rate. Legally live-in nannies must be paid for all hours worked, including applicable overtime (live-in overtime laws vary state by state, so it's important to check your specific state laws). In fact in some markets, such as Chicago, live-in nannies actually make MORE per hour than live-out nannies. Why? Because being a live-in nanny is extremely hard work and a huge sacrifice.

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Nanny Pay: Guaranteed Hours Vs. Salary

These are the two most confused terms in the nanny profession. I frequently encounter people using these terms interchangeably when they're not interchangeable. While similar, guaranteed hours and salary are not the same thing. Let me repeat, they.are.not.the.same.thing. Let's break it down:

Guaranteed hours are exactly that -- hours that are guaranteed to a nanny so they can rely on a consistent paycheck.

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3 Questions Every Nanny Needs to Ask at an Interview

This article is not about how to interview or market yourself to a potential nanny family. Instead, it is about how a nanny should interview a family to find out about potential employers. This is one of the most important things a nanny needs to do before accepting ANY nanny position. The interview for a nanny job goes both ways — while the family is interviewing and vetting the nanny, the nanny is interviewing and vetting the family at the same time. In addition to asking the parents basic questions about job expectations, compensation, or parenting style, a nanny NEEDS to inquire about the family's history with nannies. Are they good employers? Do they appreciate and respect their nannies? Are they reliable? Do they pay on time? Do they have unreasonable expectations? Are they micromanagers? Do they expect their nanny to clean up after their own messes? And most importantly, would their previous nannies recommend them and work for them again?

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